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Your search for 'Lichen Planus' returned 29 results.

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Lichen planus - printable version

Lichen planus - printable version

Oral lichen planus - printable version

Oral lichen planus - printable version

Information (8 items)

83rd Annual Meeting of the British Association of Dermatologists

83rd Annual Meeting of the British Association of Dermatologists The 83rd Annual Meeting of the British Association of Dermatologists took place at the Brighton Hilton Metrople 1st - 4th July 2003. Report by Dr Ian Coulson (Burnley) I am certain that some electronic early warning system circulates the local medical establishment on the Monday morning prior to Tuesday's scheduled departure for the BAD! Urgent clinic appointments and ward consult requests, demands to tweak medical reports...

91st Annual Meeting of the British Association of Dermatologists

91st Annual Meeting of the British Association of Dermatologists The 91st Annual Meeting of the British Association of Dermatologists took place at the ExCel-London 5th - 7th July 2011. Report by Sue Welsh (Wirral) and Niall Wilson (Liverpool) Sunshine - that source of life giving energy and of ambivalent feelings for the dermatologist - undoubtedly improves the look of a place. Hence the vast hangar that is ExCel London managed to look welcoming on the 4th of July to those attending the...

A Glimmering of Light

A Glimmering of Light Around 1860 the appearance of new textbooks and atlases began to stimulate interest in the curious. Muted voices might then occasionally have been heard pleading for the establishment of special skin facilities but the reaction to this was largely hostile, and success was minimal. The established hospitals continued to appoint inappropriate persons, usually surgeons, to take charge of their skin patients, though it should be remembered that Erasmus Wilson, Malcolm...

Dr Hugh Wallace

Dr Hugh Wallace Interviewed by Dr Victor Witten May 23 1967 in Dr Witten's home. Dr Witten: Let us begin by saying first Dr. Wallace, Dr. Hugh Wallace from London. I'm doing that in order to have it on the record and then I'll revert to Hugh if I may. Please. Hugh it's very nice to have you here with me at home, here in Miami. That you can be with us. I want to tell you now how much we enjoyed your talk yesterday at the Medical School and what a pleasure its been having you here and I think...

Emerging Heroes

Emerging Heroes In the latter half of the 19th century while specialist hospitals were developing throughout the land, a number of individual heroes were to emerge. Two pioneers appeared in Scotland, McCall Anderson in Glasgow and Allan Jamieson in Edinburgh; they were outstanding. Both had the advantage of a period of study in Vienna with the incomparable Ferdinand von Hebra, whose classification of skin diseases was formulated on the new and wholly admirable basis of his own pathological...

Medical Students

Medical Students Handbook for Medical Students and Junior Doctors (2014) The handbook is available as anelectronic copyor hard copy. Hard copies can be ordered free of charge by medical schools or other healthcare organisations based in the UK or Ireland. Please allow 2 weeks for delivery. To place an order, contact

St Johns and the IOD

St Johns and the IOD The Blackfriars Skin Hospital, for years the most important bastion of dermatology in London, was to close; St John's, by contrast, was set to grow. Its earliest days have been recorded by Russell56and the more recent ones by Samman57. The wards in Shepherd's Bush had been destroyed in an air-raid. Outpatients moved from Leicester Square to a distinctive house in Lisle Street which was set in the red-light district of Soho. Lectures were given in an unstructured programme...

Turn of the Century

Turn of the Century Some Remarkable Clinicians On the whole little interest was taken in promoting dermatological knowledge at this time, nevertheless a few outstanding individuals were to make lasting impressions. In Manchester, Louis Savatard, Brooke's pupil, was meticulously analysing all the various cutaneous malignancies. Louis Savatard (1874-1942)was a pioneer of radiotherapy but it must have been Brooke's interest in pathology that set him on his way; he was to become an...

News (6 items)

03/07/2012 - Demand for Dermatology

Demand for Dermatology It is estimated that 1 in 2 people in the UK each year, will suffer from some type of skin disease or condition. Skin cancer has the highest number of cases of any cancer in the UK. 20 per cent of children and 10 per cent of adults will suffer from eczema. There is a clear demand for services to meet this need, but for a health service that is currently facing unprecedented challenges both economic and structural, it is vitally important to find out how that need can...

05/07/2013 - A dermatology smear campaign

A dermatology smear campaign Certain drugs used to treat severe psoriasis in women may be associated with an increased risk of cervical cancer and patients and doctors need more awareness of this, suggests research from Glan Clwyd Hospital in Rhyl. The research, due to be released at the British Association of Dermatologists' Annual Conference in Liverpool next week (July 8th to 11th), retrospectively audited case notes for cervical smear documentation in female patients who had started...

20/07/2015 - One in five women with a vulval health condition contemplate self-harm or suicide

One in five women with a vulval health condition contemplate self-harm or suicide One in five patients with a condition affecting more than 300,000 women in the UK have considered suicide or self-harm, according to a survey of women with vulval health conditions released today. Vulval health conditions are common in the UK, with a conservative estimate suggesting that 1 in every 100 women in the UK suffers from Lichen Sclerosus. This is just one of a range of vulval disorders and affects 63...

A dermatology smear campaign

A dermatology smear campaign Certain drugs used to treat severe psoriasis in women may be associated with an increased risk of cervical cancer and patients and doctors need more awareness of this, suggests research from Glan Clwyd Hospital in Rhyl. The research, due to be released at the British Association of Dermatologists' Annual Conference in Liverpool next week (July 8th to 11th), retrospectively audited case notes for cervical smear documentation in female patients who had started...

Demand for Dermatology

Demand for Dermatology It is estimated that 1 in 2 people in the UK each year, will suffer from some type of skin disease or condition. Skin cancer has the highest number of cases of any cancer in the UK. 20 per cent of children and 10 per cent of adults will suffer from eczema. There is a clear demand for services to meet this need, but for a health service that is currently facing unprecedented challenges both economic and structural, it is vitally important to find out how that need can...

One in five women with a vulval health condition contemplate self-harm or suicide

One in five women with a vulval health condition contemplate self-harm or suicide One in five patients with a condition affecting more than 300,000 women in the UK have considered suicide or self-harm, according to a survey of women with vulval health conditions released today. Vulval health conditions are common in the UK, with a conservative estimate suggesting that 1 in every 100 women in the UK suffers from Lichen Sclerosus. This is just one of a range of vulval disorders and affects 63...

Patient Resource (13 items)

Acitretin

Acitretin Acitretin is a type of drug called a retinoid. Retinoids are closely related to Vitamin A and work by slowing down cell growth in the skin. ACITRETIN What are the aims of this leaflet? This leaflet has been written to help you understand more about Acitretin. It advises what it is, how it works, how it is used to treat skin conditions and where you can find out more about this drug. What is Acitretin and how does it work? Acitretin is a type of drug called a retinoid....

Calcineurin inhibitors

Calcineurin inhibitors There are two types of topical calcineurin inhibitors called tacrolimus ointment (Protopic 0.03% and 0.1%) and pimecrolimus cream (Elidel). They are classified as immunomodulating agents. This means that they act on the immune system to reduce skin inflammation. Both tacrolimus and pimecrolimus block a chemical called calcineurin which activates inflammation in the skin and causes redness and itching of the skin. CALCINEURIN INHIBITORS What are the aims of this...

Chronic paronychia

Chronic paronychia Paronychia is a common infection of the skin around the finger or toenails (the nail folds). There are two types - 'acute paronychia' develops quickly and lasts for a short period of time; and 'chronic paronychia' develops slowly, lasting for several weeks and often comes back. Chronic paronychia is not caught from someone else. CHRONIC PARONYCHIA What are the aims of this leaflet? This leaflet has been written to help you understand more about chronic paronychia. It...

Ciclosporin

Ciclosporin Like penicillin, ciclosporin is a substance produced by a fungus. Ciclosporin was found to suppress the immune system and was initially developed for suppressing the immune system of transplant patients to prevent them rejecting their transplanted kidneys and other organs. It was subsequently found to benefit patients with a wide range of diseases caused by immune reactions. CICLOSPORIN What are the aims of this leaflet? This leaflet has been written to help you understand...

Hydroxychloroquine

Hydroxychloroquine Hydroxychloroquine is one of several antimalarial drugs that have anti-inflammatory effects useful in other diseases. Hydroxychloroquine is particularly effective for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE). By reducing inflammation, hydroxychloroquine can decrease pain, swelling and stiffness of joints, and improve or clear some rashes. HYDROXYCHLOROQUINE What are the aims of this leaflet? This leaflet has been written to provide...

Lichen planopilaris

Lichen planopilaris Lichen planopilaris is a type of scarring hair loss that occurs when a relatively common skin disease, known as lichen planus, affects areas of skin where there is hair. Lichen planopilaris destroys the hair follicle and then replaces it with scarring. It is between 2 and 5 times more common in women than it is in men and is seen mostly in Caucasian adults, with the commonest age of onset being in the mid-40s. LICHEN PLANOPILARIS What are the aims of this leaflet? ...

Lichen planus

Lichen planus In dermatology, the word 'lichen' means small bumps on the skin and 'planus' means 'flat', so the name comes from a description of the rash's appearance. Lichen planusis a fairly common (0.2-1% of the population worldwide), itchy, non-contagious rash that usually occurs in adults between the ages of 40 to 60. It is rare in children. It affects all ethnicities equally; however oral disease affecting the lips and inside the mouth, may be more common in patients from the Indian...

Oral lichen planus

Oral lichen planus Lichen planus is an inflammatory condition of the skin but can also affect the mouth (oral lichen planus). Oral lichen planus may occur on its own or in combination with lichen planus of the skin, nails or genitals. It is thought to affect 1 to 2% per cent of the population, and typically it affects women after the age of 40 years. Oral lichen planus can occur in men but children are rarely affected. ORAL LICHEN PLANUS What are the aims of this leaflet? This leaflet...

Oral treatment with corticosteroids

Oral treatment with corticosteroids Your body produces corticosteroids naturally, on a daily basis. Without them it would not be possible to survive. Corticosteroids are produced in the cortex of the adrenal glands (hence the 'cortico-' part of the name). The ones used most often in medical treatment (prednisolone and dexamethasone) are not exactly the same as the ones produced in the body. It is convenient to refer to them just as 'corticosteroids' or 'steroids', but you should be aware that...

Phototherapy

Phototherapy The termphototherapyis a form of treatment where fluorescent light bulbs are used to treat skin conditions. Natural sunlight has been known to be beneficial in certain skin disorders for thousands of years, and it is the ultraviolet part of the radiation produced by the sun that is used in phototherapy, in particular the ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) wavelengths of light. PHOTOTHERAPY What are the aims of this leaflet? This leaflet has been written to help you...

Thalidomide

Thalidomide Thalidomide was first introduced in 1957 as a sedative tablet that could also control severe morning sickness in pregnant women. When taken in pregnancy, it was associated with severe birth defects from which many babies died across the world. This did not result in any action for several years and it was withdrawn from the UK in 1961. After this tragedy, stronger rules were introduced to improve the safety of medicines. Thalidomide re-emerged as a therapeutic agent and in 1998...

UK Lichen Planus

UK Lichen Planus UK Lichen Planus is a patient support network for people affected by any form of the skin disease Lichen Planus (LP). The group is open to members worldwide; however treatments are based on those used in the UK. Aims To build a strong network of support and to facilitate informal meetings to give that all important personal contact with others living with LP. To share ideas, knowledge and experience on a support forum via the website. To provide up to date information and...

Zoon's balanitis

Zoon's balanitis Zoon's balanitis describes inflammation of the head of the penis (glans penis) and foreskin. It usually affects middle-aged to elderly men who have not been circumcised. The word balanitis is derived from the Greek word balanos, which means 'acorn'. The ending '-itis' stands for inflammation. Balanitis means inflammation of the glans penis. Zoon's balanitis is named after Professor Zoon, a Dutch dermatologist, who described the condition in 1952.In addition to the glans...

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