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The Cosmetic Practice Standards Authority welcomes the introduction of a curriculum for non-surgical cosmetic procedures

The Cosmetic Practice Standards Authority (CPSA), a tripartite group consisting of the British Association of Dermatologists (BAD), the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (BAAPS) and the British Association of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons (BAPRAS), welcomes the introduction today of a curriculum for non-surgical cosmetic procedures.

The new Health Education England (HEE) curriculum was developed in conjunction with members of the Cosmetic Practice Standards Authority as a response to the Keogh Review into the regulation of cosmetic interventions*. 

The new curriculum is a training standard for all practitioners of non-surgical cosmetic interventions, including both clinicians and non-clinicians, in order to ensure a minimum standard of training across the board. 

The CPSA believes that patient safety is paramount, and the need for improved training is highlighted by the most recent audit of CPSA members, which showed:

• 58 per cent of the dermatologists answering the survey had seen patients with complications from non-surgical cosmetic procedures.
• 54 per cent of these complications were due to dermal filler injections. Of these, 33 per cent had granuloma formation and 10 per cent had allergic reactions. Granuloma formation is a chronic, debilitating foreign body reaction, where chronic nodules develop which may require treatment with systemic immunosuppressive agents and recurrent surgical removal.
• 63 per cent of respondents stated the complications were irreversible or chronic.
• 59 per cent of respondents stated the complications had a highly negative impact on the patient's quality of life.
• 49 per cent of respondents felt there was either a missed diagnosis of skin disease, or inappropriate treatment of skin disease associated with the non-surgical cosmetic procedure (including skin cancer).
• The two main areas where complications arose were laser/light treatments (67 per cent) and dermal fillers (54 per cent).

Dr Tamara Griffiths of the British Association of Dermatologists said: 

“We welcome the development of these training standards which, crucially, cover both clinicians and non-clinicians. When developing standards for non-surgical cosmetic interventions, common sense dictates that they apply to everyone practising these procedures, not just doctors and nurses.

“With the curriculum in place, it is also paramount that all relevant professional groups work together to develop an agreed model both for setting standards and for oversight of the sector. This process is still in its infancy and openness, transparency and full collaboration is required.”

ENDS

Notes to Editors:

The Cosmetic Practice Standards Authority (CPSA) is a tripartite group consisting of the British Association of Dermatologists (BAD), the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (BAAPS), and the British Association of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons (BAPRAS). 

*Keogh, B. (2013). Review of the Regulation of Cosmetic Interventions. Available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/192028/Review_of_the_Regulation_of_Cosmetic_Interventions.pdf
 

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