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A Joint RCGP/Specialist Organisation (BAD) Approach to a Replacement Process for the Accreditation and Re-Accreditation of General Practitioners with a Special Interest (GPwSI): A Report of a Pilot Study in Assessing GPs with Extended Roles in Dermatology

GPs
who
undertake
‘extended
roles’,
i.e.
roles
outside
the
scope
of
the
GP
curriculum,
make
an
important
contribution
to
the
health
service,
particularly
in
terms
of
bridging
the
gap
between
primary
and
secondary
care
and
enabling
patients
to
receive
high
quality
care
in
a
community
setting.
The
Royal
College
of
General
Practitioners
(RCGP)
and
the
British
Association
of
Dermatologists
(BAD)
have
worked
closely
in
collaboration
to
ensure
that
appropriate
standards
exist
for
GPs
undertaking
extended
scopes
of
practice
in
Dermatology.
The
restructure
of
primary
care
in
England,
the
introduction
of
revalidation
for
UK-­-licensed
doctors
and
the
move
towards
a
system
of
‘credentialing’
for
roles
over
and
above
core
roles
for
all
medical
practitioners,
present
an
opportunity
to
introduce
more
consistent
processes
to
ensure
that
GPs
who
are
practising
outside
the
scope
of
the
GP
curriculum
are
doing
so
safely
and
effectively,
with
appropriate
local
support
and
the
right
level
of
integration
with
secondary
care.
The
pilot
has
identified
a
number
of
current
issues,
which
the
RCGP
and
BAD
will
seek
to
address
through
discussion
with
NHS
England
and
other
relevant
stakeholders.
However,
in
the
longer
term
it
will
also
inform
the
development
of
credentialing
models
and
thinking
about
new
models
of
care.
Whilst
GPs
with
Special
Interests
(GPwSI)
were
the
initial
focus
of
the
pilot,
the
pilot
team
recognised
the
need
to
consider
how
the
processes
to
be
evaluated
in
the
pilot
would
sit
with
credentialing
as
a
developing
policy,
having
been
given
impetus
by
the
Shape
of
Medical
Training
(SoT)
review.
Since
the
pilot
was
commissioned
the
RCGP
adopted
the
term
“GPs
with
Extended
roles”
(GPwER)
to
describe
all
general
practitioners
who
undertake
activities
that
are
beyond
the
scope
of
GP
training
and
the
MRCGP
examination
including,
as
a
subset,
GPs
who
are
commissioned
to
perform
specialised
clinical
services
in
a
community
or
hospital
setting
as
an
extended
scope
of
practice.
This
report
needs
to
be
set
in
the
context
of
this
change
of
terminology
in
terms
of
informing
our
future
planning.
GPs who undertake 'extended roles' i.e. roles outside the scope of the GP curriculum, make an important contribution to the health service, particularly in terms of bridging the gap between primary and secondary care and enabling patients to receive high quality care in a community setting.
 
The Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) and the British Association of Dermatologists (BAD) have worked closely in collaboration to ensure that appropriate standards exist for GPs undertaking extended scopes of practice in Dermatology. The restructure of primary care in England, the introduction of revalidation for UK-licensed doctors and the move towards a system of 'credentialing' for roles over and above core roles for all medical practitioners, present an opportunity to introduce more consistent processes to ensure that GPs who are practising outside the scope of the GP curriculum are doing so safely and effectively, with appropriate local support and the right level of integration with secondary care. The pilot has identified a number of current issues, which the RCGP and BAD will seek to address through discussion with NHS England and other relevant stakeholders. However, in the longer term it will also inform the development of credentialing models and thinking about new models of care.
 
The full report can be found below.
 
 
undertake
‘extended
roles’,
i.e.
roles
outside
the
scope
of
the
GP
curriculum,
make
an
important
contribution
to
the
health
service,
particularly
in
terms
of
bridging
the
gap
between
primary
and
secondary
care
and
enabling
patients
to
receive
high
quality
care
in
a
community
setting.
The
Royal
College
of
General
Practitioners
(RCGP)
and
the
British
Association
of
Dermatologists
(BAD)
have
worked
closely
in
collaboration
to
ensure
that
appropriate
standards
exist
for
GPs
undertaking
extended
scopes
of
practice
in
Dermatology.
The
restructure
of
primary
care
in
England,
the
introduction
of
revalidation
for
UK-­-licensed
doctors
and
the
move
towards
a
system
of
‘credentialing’
for
roles
over
and
above
core
roles
for
all
medical
practitioners,
present
an
opportunity
to
introduce
more
consistent
processes
to
ensure
that
GPs
who
are
practising
outside
the
scope
of
the
GP
curriculum
are
doing
so
safely
and
effectively,
with
appropriate
local
support
and
the
right
level
of
integration
with
secondary
care.
The
pilot
has
identified
a
number
of
current
issues,
which
the
RCGP
and
BAD
will
seek
to
address
through
discussion
with
NHS
England
and
other
relevant
stakeholders.
However,
in
the
longer
term
it
will
also
inform
the
development
of
credentialing
models
and
thinking
about
new
models
of
care.
Whilst
GPs
with
Special
Interests
(GPwSI)
were
the
initial
focus
of
the
pilot,
the
pilot
team
recognised
the
need
to
consider
how
the
processes
to
be
evaluated
in
the
pilot
would
sit
with
credentialing
as
a
developing
policy,
having
been
given
impetus
by
the
Shape
of
Medical
Training
(SoT)
review.
Since
the
pilot
was
commissioned
the
RCGP
adopted
the
term
“GPs
with
Extended
roles”
(GPwER)
to
describe
all
general
practitioners
who
undertake
activities
that
are
beyond
the
scope
of
GP
training
and
the
MRCGP
examination
including,
as
a
subset,
GPs
who
are
commissioned
to
perform
specialised
clinical
services
in
a
community
or
hospital
setting
as
an
extended
scope
of
practice.
This
report
needs
to
be
set
in
the
context
of
this
change
of
terminology
in
terms
of
informing
our
future
planning.
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