Patient Information Leaflets (PILs)

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These Patient Information Leaflets (PILs) are specially written by the British Association of Dermatologists (BAD).

The BAD has been awarded The Information Standard certification for the process it employs to develop information products aimed at the general public, which include PILs, Sun Awareness Campaign materials, and other information products.

The BAD shall hold responsibility for the accuracy of the information published, and neither the scheme operator nor the scheme owner shall have any responsibility for costs, losses, or direct or indirect damages or costs arising from inaccuracy of information or omissions in information published on the website on behalf of the BAD.

Displaying item Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) is a rare inherited skin disorder. The skin of those who have DEB is more fragile than normal. Minor injury causes blisters which often leave scars when they heal. DEB can be mild, causing little more than minor inconvenience, but it can also be severe, affecting the mouth, gullet and eyes in addition to the skin. DEB is not an infection, it is not contagious and it is not due to an allergy.

Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) is divided into two major types depending on inheritance pattern: recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) and dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DDEB). Each type is further subdivided into multiple clinical subtypes.

DEB is different from the other forms of epidermolysis bullosa (EB), which include epidermolysis bullosa simplex, junctional epidermolysis bullosa and Kindler Syndrome. Individuals who have DEB will not develop one of the other types of epidermolysis bullosa at a later date. 

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