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Patient Information Leaflets (PILs)

These Patient Information Leaflets (PILs) are specially written by the British Association of Dermatologists (BAD). A small selection is available in booklet format and can be ordered by filling in an order form.

The BAD has been awarded The Information Standard certification for the process it employs to develop information products aimed at the general public, which include PILs, Sun Awareness Campaign materials, and other information products.

The BAD shall hold responsibility for the accuracy of the information published, and neither the scheme operator nor the scheme owner shall have any responsibility for costs, losses, or direct or indirect damages or costs arising from inaccuracy of information or omissions in information published on the website on behalf of the BAD.

Please note:

  1. There are thousands of different skin complaints, therefore, the focus of the British Association of Dermatologists' PILs production is on the most common, rarest or debilitating skin conditions.
  2. The offer to provide details of source materials used to inform British Association of Dermatologists' PILs is for instances where the advice provided perhaps does not reflect local practice, and not an offer to conduct literature searches or supply bibilographic materials for your own research.
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Discoid eczema

Eczema (also called dermatitis) is a term used to describe conditions where there is inflammation affecting mainly the outer layer of the skin (the epidermis). There are several different types of eczema, and in some cases the cause is known whilst in others it is not.

Discoid eczema is one type of eczema with characteristic round or oval red patches of inflamed skin. Discoid eczema is sometimes also called “nummular” eczema - nummular meaning coin-shaped and discoid meaning disc-shaped.

Discoid eczema is more common in men than women.  Men tend to develop the skin condition over the age of 50, whilst women are more likely to develop it in their teens or twenties. It is rare in children; however, it can be seen in both sexes at any time of life.

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