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Patient Information Leaflets (PILs)

These Patient Information Leaflets (PILs) are specially written by the British Association of Dermatologists (BAD). A small selection is available in booklet format and can be ordered by filling in an order form.

The BAD has been awarded The Information Standard certification for the process it employs to develop information products aimed at the general public, which include PILs, Sun Awareness Campaign materials, and other information products.

The BAD shall hold responsibility for the accuracy of the information published, and neither the scheme operator nor the scheme owner shall have any responsibility for costs, losses, or direct or indirect damages or costs arising from inaccuracy of information or omissions in information published on the website on behalf of the BAD.

Please note:

  1. There are thousands of different skin complaints, therefore, the focus of the British Association of Dermatologists' PILs production is on the most common, rarest or debilitating skin conditions.
  2. The offer to provide details of source materials used to inform British Association of Dermatologists' PILs is for instances where the advice provided perhaps does not reflect local practice, and not an offer to conduct literature searches or supply bibilographic materials for your own research.
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Atypical mole syndrome

Atypical mole syndrome is a disorder of the skin which is seen in approximately 2% of the population. It is defined when an individual has more than 50 moles composed of melanocytes (pigment producing skin cells) present on their skin, and three or more are atypical (unusual) in their appearance, e.g. size and shape. An atypical mole is one greater than 5 mm in diameter, often with flat and raised areas, often oval rather than round, and often with some colour variation.

Solitary atypical moles are individually benign moles with a low risk of progression to melanoma (a type of skin cancer). However, people with multiple atypical moles (atypical mole syndrome) are considered to have a higher risk (increased 7 to 10 fold) of developing melanoma compared to the general population, due to the presence of atypical molesespecially if some of these moles are on the scalp, buttocks, or feet.The risk is increased further if one or more first or second degree relatives (i.e. a close blood relative including parents, full siblings or children, or a blood relative including grandparents, grandchildren, aunts, uncles, nephews, nieces or half-siblings, respectively) have been diagnosed with malignant melanoma; this combination is known as familial atypical mole syndrome.

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