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Events

95th Annual Meeting of the British Association of Dermatologists

The 95th Annual Meeting of the British Association of Dermatologists took place in Manchester 7th - 9th July 2015.

Report by Mark Griffiths

Manchester Central provided a warm reception for the 95th Annual Meeting in July this year. Somewhat less

warm was the changeable weather, with several seasons represented in the same day. Walking to the shops in the driving rain to purchase an umbrella was one of my first activities, and you would have thought, growing up in Cumbria, I might have remembered a coat too! When the showers abated, shards of light broke through the fast moving low clouds, illuminating the magnificent buildings around the venue. A great start to the Annual Meeting… and an atmospheric nod to the World Health Organisation’s year of light.

Weather aside, and with the usual consistency, Christopher Garrett and the conference team once again delivered a fantastic Annual Meeting, building on the successes of previous years. This year saw a record 1,263 delegates, continuing on the upward trend seen over the past four years, and with attendees travelling from 27 different countries, including 7 from Australia, 5 from New Zealand and 11 from India. A truly international meeting! The conference has been a challenge for the past couple of years for me, fulfilling Officer commitments but also trying to maximise my attendance at the sessions. Monday, as usual, started with the Specialty and Associate Specialist Sub-Committee Meeting, one of my favourite committees and a good start to the meeting. This was followed by the Speciality and Associate Specialist session. Once again Glenda Hill and the organising committee put on a great programme focussed on practical tips for everyday practice. At the same time the Trainee session was underway and luckily, whilst walking through The Gallery area, I bumped in to some of our current and previous SpRs having coffee in their designated break. It was a great opportunity to catch up on news and assimilate some of their newly acquired knowledge! The rest of the day was spent planning how to spend my time at the meeting which I always find immensely difficult.

Tuesday, spoilt for choice, I attended the British Society for Cutaneous Allergy session. The Prosser White Oration delivered by Professor Magnus Bruze entitled ‘So you think you know how to patch test?’ did exactly what the title suggests and preceded a lively discussion about ironing water and ironing in general which went a bit off topic! After the break I went to the International Psoriasis Council – Meet The Expert session which was full of practical information on managing challenging psoriasis. The room was packed and the session generated lots of debate.

Wednesday saw the introduction of a new International CPD Session with experts drawn from France, USA and Switzerland. This was followed by the AGM which seemed to flow harmoniously. In the afternoon, the British Cosmetic Dermatology Group session, which was a personal highlight, was brimming with attendees and for me addressed an important subject area previously missing from our Annual Meetings.

On Thursday Professor Masayuki Amagai delivered the Arthur Rook Oration on Targeting antigen-specific immune cells. Throughout his colourful presentation it was fascinating to hear how our understanding of immunology, through his research, is evolving over time. Later in the afternoon Professor Chris Griffiths, the Sir Archibald Gray Medal recipient, gave an inspiring talk entitled Psoriasis: A Natural History.

So, whilst Officer commitments meant that a significant proportion of my time at the conference was spent at meetings, I am pleased that I had the opportunity to attend as many of the sessions as I did. I also found time to view the posters in the exhibition hall which played host to the popular hot topic sessions and the new poster presentations.

I have taken home key messages to improve my practice and also inspiration for further learning.

I found this year’s venue particularly conducive to fortuitous meetings. It was great to be able to catch up with colleagues and friends. This year’s meeting reiterates to me what a privilege it is to be a part of UK dermatology. For me, the only disappointment is the absence of the Dermatology Nurses. I look forward to next year’s meeting in Birmingham. Thank you to Professor Irene Leigh, Christopher Garret and the conference team for putting together such a successful and notable meeting.

y overwhelming impression of
this year’s very comprehensive
BAD meeting in Glasgow was
really positive. As a jobbing dermatologist
I value the opportunity of being able
to benchmark my practice to that of
colleagues from across the UK as well
as Europe and Asia. I have visited
Glasgow and the conference venue on
several occasions. However, this time the
atmosphere in the City was really alive
and buzzing, but I suspect that this had
something to do with the imminent start
of the Commonwealth Games rather than
the arrival of a few hundred enthusiastic
dermatologists! Nevertheless, by arriving
early I was able to spend a wonderful
Monday afternoon soaking up the
atmosphere walking around the botanical
gardens and strolling along the banks of
the River Kelvin and having some brief
retail therapy.
Before the conference starts I usually
find it helpful to plan my programme
of educational events and found using
the BAD app a great first experience. I
would strongly recommend that anyone
coming to a conference brings their
tablet or iPad and use such apps. I found
I could easily set up a full and productive
day and in my spare few minutes I was
able to view the poster abstracts and
then go and read the relevant ones in
more detail during the breaks. However,
using it to take meaningful notes was
challenging and I soon learnt to switch
off auto-suggest and auto-complete
pretty quickly to make any sense of what
Karen Gibbon
Whipps Cross Hospital Karen Gibbon
I’d written! A slight irritation was that I
couldn’t export my notes as a single
document (on which I could also add my
reflections of the meeting for my PDP) –
perhaps this could be addressed for next
year’s conference app? – or maybe the
right ‘techie person’ could have a quiet
word with me about how to do it?
The absence of nurses at the meeting
this year was, for me, a bonus and
I found it much easier to talk to the
exhibitors and sponsors more effectively.
I still enjoyed collecting my samples and
goody bags, but felt everything was much
less rushed. However, I have my doubts
about the wisdom of having different
talks simultaneously scheduled in the
same exhibition space as I found I could
not concentrate at all at these events
and gave them a miss. I also found the
Pharma Regulatory Focus session rather
unsatisfactory. It was generally poorly
attended and I thought the content very
dry in contrast to last year’s excellent
session. I did, however, enjoy Sir Ian
Kennedy’s talk without the distraction of
powerpoint slides.
The AGM is an integral part of the BAD
meeting and lively discussions were
had particularly around the issue of
subscription rates for different categories
of members. However, to my mind, the
outstanding event was Professor Bunker’s
excellent speech explaining where
we’ve come from, where we are now
and where we might want to be in the
future. He richly deserved the standing
ovation he received. As a member of the
BAD’s Clinical Services Unit I can only
corroborate how sad it is to see how
many of our members are struggling and
in real conflict with hospital managers and
CCGs who are trying to destabilise their
services.
More positively, I thought that a great
addition to this year’s programme was
the contribution made by the newly
formed British Society for Skin Care in
Immunocompromised individuals. This,
combined with the various biologics
updates, symposia and case reports,
really opened my eyes again to the
importance of screening patients very
carefully for infections and ensuring that
adequate surgical margins are performed
for skin cancers in high risk patients.
The new format of the BAD meeting
means that social events such as the
BSF evening walk have been omitted
which, I confess, I miss. However, it
was good to note the presence of
several consultant colleagues who once
attended my clinics and wrote audits
and case reports as medical students
and registrars. Inspiring and teaching
the next generation of students and
doctors to become dermatologists is a
great privilege and I wish to personally
thank three great teachers in Professors
Cunliffe, Marks and Leigh all of whom
have been tremendously supportive to
me.
What will I do differently as a result of
attending the BAD 2014 conference?
Pay my subscription for the British
Senior Skin Group; play mindfulness
tapes in phototherapy to shorten time
to clearance in psoriasis; keep more up
to date with the genetics of skin disease
and continue to press for proper nursing
support to keep running BADBIR within
my hospital.vjfjfjy overwhelming impression of
this year’s very comprehensive
BAD meeting in Glasgow was
really positive. As a jobbing dermatologist
I value the opportunity of being able
to benchmark my practice to that of
colleagues from across the UK as well
as Europe and Asia. I have visited
Glasgow and the conference venue on
several occasions. However, this time the
atmosphere in the City was really alive
and buzzing, but I suspect that this had
something to do with the imminent start
of the Commonwealth Games rather than
the arrival of a few hundred enthusiastic
dermatologists! Nevertheless, by arriving
early I was able to spend a wonderful
Monday afternoon soaking up the
atmosphere walking around the botanical
gardens and strolling along the banks of
the River Kelvin and having some brief
retail therapy.
Before the conference starts I usually
find it helpful to plan my programme
of educational events and found using
the BAD app a great first experience. I
would strongly recommend that anyone
coming to a conference brings their
tablet or iPad and use such apps. I found
I could easily set up a full and productive
day and in my spare few minutes I was
able to view the poster abstracts and
then go and read the relevant ones in
more detail during the breaks. However,
using it to take meaningful notes was
challenging and I soon learnt to switch
off auto-suggest and auto-complete
pretty quickly to make any sense of what
Karen Gibbon
Whipps Cross Hospital Karen Gibbon
I’d written! A slight irritation was that I
couldn’t export my notes as a single
document (on which I could also add my
reflections of the meeting for my PDP) –
perhaps this could be addressed for next
year’s conference app? – or maybe the
right ‘techie person’ could have a quiet
word with me about how to do it?
The absence of nurses at the meeting
this year was, for me, a bonus and
I found it much easier to talk to the
exhibitors and sponsors more effectively.
I still enjoyed collecting my samples and
goody bags, but felt everything was much
less rushed. However, I have my doubts
about the wisdom of having different
talks simultaneously scheduled in the
same exhibition space as I found I could
not concentrate at all at these events
and gave them a miss. I also found the
Pharma Regulatory Focus session rather
unsatisfactory. It was generally poorly
attended and I thought the content very
dry in contrast to last year’s excellent
session. I did, however, enjoy Sir Ian
Kennedy’s talk without the distraction of
powerpoint slides.
The AGM is an integral part of the BAD
meeting and lively discussions were
had particularly around the issue of
subscription rates for different categories
of members. However, to my mind, the
outstanding event was Professor Bunker’s
excellent speech explaining where
we’ve come from, where we are now
and where we might want to be in the
future. He richly deserved the standing
ovation he received. As a member of the
BAD’s Clinical Services Unit I can only
corroborate how sad it is to see how
many of our members are struggling and
in real conflict with hospital managers and
CCGs who are trying to destabilise their
services.
More positively, I thought that a great
addition to this year’s programme was
the contribution made by the newly
formed British Society for Skin Care in
Immunocompromised individuals. This,
combined with the various biologics
updates, symposia and case reports,
really opened my eyes again to the
importance of screening patients very
carefully for infections and ensuring that
adequate surgical margins are performed
for skin cancers in high risk patients.
The new format of the BAD meeting
means that social events such as the
BSF evening walk have been omitted
which, I confess, I miss. However, it
was good to note the presence of
several consultant colleagues who once
attended my clinics and wrote audits
and case reports as medical students
and registrars. Inspiring and teaching
the next generation of students and
doctors to become dermatologists is a
great privilege and I wish to personally
thank three great teachers in Professors
Cunliffe, Marks and Leigh all of whom
have been tremendously supportive to
me.
What will I do differently as a result of
attending the BAD 2014 conference?
Pay my subscription for the British
Senior Skin Group; play mindfulness
tapes in phototherapy to shorten time
to clearance in psoriasis; keep more up
to date with the genetics of skin disease
and continue to press for proper nursing
support to keep running BADBIR within
my hospital.overwhelming impression of
this year’s very comprehensive
BAD meeting in Glasgow was
really positive. As a jobbing dermatologist
I value the opportunity of being able
to benchmark my practice to that of
colleagues from across the UK as well
as Europe and Asia. I have visited
Glasgow and the conference venue on
several occasions. However, this time the
atmosphere in the City was really alive
and buzzing, but I suspect that this had
something to do with the imminent start
of the Commonwealth Games rather than
the arrival of a few hundred enthusiastic
dermatologists! Nevertheless, by arriving
early I was able to spend a wonderful
Monday afternoon soaking up the
atmosphere walking around the botanical
gardens and strolling along the banks of
the River Kelvin and having some brief
retail therapy.
Before the conference starts I usually
find it helpful to plan my programme
of educational events and found using
the BAD app a great first experience. I
would strongly recommend that anyone
coming to a conference brings their
tablet or iPad and use such apps. I found
I could easily set up a full and productive
day and in my spare few minutes I was
able to view the poster abstracts and
then go and read the relevant ones in
more detail during the breaks. However,
using it to take meaningful notes was
challenging and I soon learnt to switch
off auto-suggest and auto-complete
pretty quickly to make any sense of what
Karen Gibbon
Whipps Cross Hospital Karen Gibbon
I’d written! A slight irritation was that I
couldn’t export my notes as a single
document (on which I could also add my
reflections of the meeting for my PDP) –
perhaps this could be addressed for next
year’s conference app? – or maybe the
right ‘techie person’ could have a quiet
word with me about how to do it?
The absence of nurses at the meeting
this year was, for me, a bonus and
I found it much easier to talk to the
exhibitors and sponsors more effectively.
I still enjoyed collecting my samples and
goody bags, but felt everything was much
less rushed. However, I have my doubts
about the wisdom of having different
talks simultaneously scheduled in the
same exhibition space as I found I could
not concentrate at all at these events
and gave them a miss. I also found the
Pharma Regulatory Focus session rather
unsatisfactory. It was generally poorly
attended and I thought the content very
dry in contrast to last year’s excellent
session. I did, however, enjoy Sir Ian
Kennedy’s talk without the distraction of
powerpoint slides.
The AGM is an integral part of the BAD
meeting and lively discussions were
had particularly around the issue of
subscription rates for different categories
of members. However, to my mind, the
outstanding event was Professor Bunker’s
excellent speech explaining where
we’ve come from, where we are now
and where we might want to be in the
future. He richly deserved the standing
ovation he received. As a member of the
BAD’s Clinical Services Unit I can only
corroborate how sad it is to see how
many of our members are struggling and
in real conflict with hospital managers and
CCGs who are trying to destabilise their
services.
More positively, I thought that a great
addition to this year’s programme was
the contribution made by the newly
formed British Society for Skin Care in
Immunocompromised individuals. This,
combined with the various biologics
updates, symposia and case reports,
really opened my eyes again to the
importance of screening patients very
carefully for infections and ensuring that
adequate surgical margins are performed
for skin cancers in high risk patients.
The new format of the BAD meeting
means that social events such as the
BSF evening walk have been omitted
which, I confess, I miss. However, it
was good to note the presence of
several consultant colleagues who once
attended my clinics and wrote audits
and case reports as medical students
and registrars. Inspiring and teaching
the next generation of students and
doctors to become dermatologists is a
great privilege and I wish to personally
thank three great teachers in Professors
Cunliffe, Marks and Leigh all of whom
have been tremendously supportive to
me.
What will I do differently as a result of
attending the BAD 2014 conference?
Pay my subscription for the British
Senior Skin Group; play mindfulness
tapes in phototherapy to shorten time
to clearance in psoriasis; keep more up
to date with the genetics of skin disease
and continue to press for proper nursing
support to keep running BADBIR within
my hospital.y overwhelming impression of
this year’s very comprehensive
BAD meeting in Glasgow was
really positive. As a jobbing dermatologist
I value the opportunity of being able
to benchmark my practice to that of
colleagues from across the UK as well
as Europe and Asia. I have visited
Glasgow and the conference venue on
several occasions. However, this time the
atmosphere in the City was really alive
and buzzing, but I suspect that this had
something to do with the imminent start
of the Commonwealth Games rather than
the arrival of a few hundred enthusiastic
dermatologists! Nevertheless, by arriving
early I was able to spend a wonderful
Monday afternoon soaking up the
atmosphere walking around the botanical
gardens and strolling along the banks of
the River Kelvin and having some brief
retail therapy.
Before the conference starts I usually
find it helpful to plan my programme
of educational events and found using
the BAD app a great first experience. I
would strongly recommend that anyone
coming to a conference brings their
tablet or iPad and use such apps. I found
I could easily set up a full and productive
day and in my spare few minutes I was
able to view the poster abstracts and
then go and read the relevant ones in
more detail during the breaks. However,
using it to take meaningful notes was
challenging and I soon learnt to switch
off auto-suggest and auto-complete
pretty quickly to make any sense of what
Karen Gibbon
Whipps Cross Hospital Karen Gibbon
I’d written! A slight irritation was that I
couldn’t export my notes as a single
document (on which I could also add my
reflections of the meeting for my PDP) –
perhaps this could be addressed for next
year’s conference app? – or maybe the
right ‘techie person’ could have a quiet
word with me about how to do it?
The absence of nurses at the meeting
this year was, for me, a bonus and
I found it much easier to talk to the
exhibitors and sponsors more effectively.
I still enjoyed collecting my samples and
goody bags, but felt everything was much
less rushed. However, I have my doubts
about the wisdom of having different
talks simultaneously scheduled in the
same exhibition space as I found I could
not concentrate at all at these events
and gave them a miss. I also found the
Pharma Regulatory Focus session rather
unsatisfactory. It was generally poorly
attended and I thought the content very
dry in contrast to last year’s excellent
session. I did, however, enjoy Sir Ian
Kennedy’s talk without the distraction of
powerpoint slides.
The AGM is an integral part of the BAD
meeting and lively discussions were
had particularly around the issue of
subscription rates for different categories
of members. However, to my mind, the
outstanding event was Professor Bunker’s
excellent speech explaining where
we’ve come from, where we are now
and where we might want to be in the
future. He richly deserved the standing
ovation he received. As a member of the
BAD’s Clinical Services Unit I can only
corroborate how sad it is to see how
many of our members are struggling and
in real conflict with hospital managers and
CCGs who are trying to destabilise their
services.
More positively, I thought that a great
addition to this year’s programme was
the contribution made by the newly
formed British Society for Skin Care in
Immunocompromised individuals. This,
combined with the various biologics
updates, symposia and case reports,
really opened my eyes again to the
importance of screening patients very
carefully for infections and ensuring that
adequate surgical margins are performed
for skin cancers in high risk patients.
The new format of the BAD meeting
means that social events such as the
BSF evening walk have been omitted
which, I confess, I miss. However, it
was good to note the presence of
several consultant colleagues who once
attended my clinics and wrote audits
and case reports as medical students
and registrars. Inspiring and teaching
the next generation of students and
doctors to become dermatologists is a
great privilege and I wish to personally
thank three great teachers in Professors
Cunliffe, Marks and Leigh all of whom
have been tremendously supportive to
me.
What will I do differently as a result of
attending the BAD 2014 conference?
Pay my subscription for the British
Senior Skin Group; play mindfulness
tapes in phototherapy to shorten time
to clearance in psoriasis; keep more up
to date with the genetics of skin disease
and continue to press for proper nursing
support to keep running BADBIR within
my hospital.y overwhelming impression of
this year’s very comprehensive
BAD meeting in Glasgow was
really positive. As a jobbing dermatologist
I value the opportunity of being able
to benchmark my practice to that of
colleagues from across the UK as well
as Europe and Asia. I have visited
Glasgow and the conference venue on
several occasions. However, this time the
atmosphere in the City was really alive
and buzzing, but I suspect that this had
something to do with the imminent start
of the Commonwealth Games rather than
the arrival of a few hundred enthusiastic
dermatologists! Nevertheless, by arriving
early I was able to spend a wonderful
Monday afternoon soaking up the
atmosphere walking around the botanical
gardens and strolling along the banks of
the River Kelvin and having some brief
retail therapy.
Before the conference starts I usually
find it helpful to plan my programme
of educational events and found using
the BAD app a great first experience. I
would strongly recommend that anyone
coming to a conference brings their
tablet or iPad and use such apps. I found
I could easily set up a full and productive
day and in my spare few minutes I was
able to view the poster abstracts and
then go and read the relevant ones in
more detail during the breaks. However,
using it to take meaningful notes was
challenging and I soon learnt to switch
off auto-suggest and auto-complete
pretty quickly to make any sense of what
Karen Gibbon
Whipps Cross Hospital Karen Gibbon
I’d written! A slight irritation was that I
couldn’t export my notes as a single
document (on which I could also add my
reflections of the meeting for my PDP) –
perhaps this could be addressed for next
year’s conference app? – or maybe the
right ‘techie person’ could have a quiet
word with me about how to do it?
The absence of nurses at the meeting
this year was, for me, a bonus and
I found it much easier to talk to the
exhibitors and sponsors more effectively.
I still enjoyed collecting my samples and
goody bags, but felt everything was much
less rushed. However, I have my doubts
about the wisdom of having different
talks simultaneously scheduled in the
same exhibition space as I found I could
not concentrate at all at these events
and gave them a miss. I also found the
Pharma Regulatory Focus session rather
unsatisfactory. It was generally poorly
attended and I thought the content very
dry in contrast to last year’s excellent
session. I did, however, enjoy Sir Ian
Kennedy’s talk without the distraction of
powerpoint slides.
The AGM is an integral part of the BAD
meeting and lively discussions were
had particularly around the issue of
subscription rates for different categories
of members. However, to my mind, the
outstanding event was Professor Bunker’s
excellent speech explaining where
we’ve come from, where we are now
and where we might want to be in the
future. He richly deserved the standing
ovation he received. As a member of the
BAD’s Clinical Services Unit I can only
corroborate how sad it is to see how
many of our members are struggling and
in real conflict with hospital managers and
CCGs who are trying to destabilise their
services.
More positively, I thought that a great
addition to this year’s programme was
the contribution made by the newly
formed British Society for Skin Care in
Immunocompromised individuals. This,
combined with the various biologics
updates, symposia and case reports,
really opened my eyes again to the
importance of screening patients very
carefully for infections and ensuring that
adequate surgical margins are performed
for skin cancers in high risk patients.
The new format of the BAD meeting
means that social events such as the
BSF evening walk have been omitted
which, I confess, I miss. However, it
was good to note the presence of
several consultant colleagues who once
attended my clinics and wrote audits
and case reports as medical students
and registrars. Inspiring and teaching
the next generation of students and
doctors to become dermatologists is a
great privilege and I wish to personally
thank three great teachers in Professors
Cunliffe, Marks and Leigh all of whom
have been tremendously supportive to
me.
What will I do differently as a result of
attending the BAD 2014 conference?
Pay my subscription for the British
Senior Skin Group; play mindfulness
tapes in phototherapy to shorten time
to clearance in psoriasis; keep more up
to date with the genetics of skin disease
and continue to press for proper nursing
support to keep running BADBIR within
my hospital.
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