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Events

94th Annual Meeting of the British Association of Dermatologists

The 94th Annual Meeting of the British Association of Dermatologists took place at the SECC Glasgow 1st - 3rd July 2014.

Report by Karen Gibbon (London)

My overwhelming impression of this year’s very comprehensive BAD meeting in Glasgow was really positive. As a jobbing dermatologist I value the opportunity of being able to benchmark my practice to that of colleagues from across

 the UK as well as Europe and Asia. I have visited Glasgow and the conference venue on several occasions. However, this time the atmosphere in the City was really alive and buzzing, but I suspect that this had something to do with the imminent start of the Commonwealth Games rather than the arrival of a few hundred enthusiastic dermatologists! Nevertheless, by arriving early I was able to spend a wonderful Monday afternoon soaking up the atmosphere walking around the botanical gardens and strolling along the banks of the River Kelvin and having some brief retail therapy.

Before the conference starts I usually find it helpful to plan my programme of educational events and found using the BAD app a great first experience. I would strongly recommend that anyone coming to a conference brings their tablet or iPad and use such apps. I found I could easily set up a full and productive day and in my spare few minutes I was able to view the poster abstracts and then go and read the relevant ones in more detail during the breaks. However, using it to take meaningful notes was challenging and I soon learnt to switch off auto-suggest and auto-complete pretty quickly to make any sense of what I’d written! A slight irritation was that I couldn’t export my notes as a single document (on which I could also add my reflections of the meeting for my PDP) – perhaps this could be addressed for next year’s conference app? – or maybe the right ‘techie person’ could have a quiet word with me about how to do it?

The absence of nurses at the meeting this year was, for me, a bonus and I found it much easier to talk to the exhibitors and sponsors more effectively. I still enjoyed collecting my samples and goody bags, but felt everything was much less rushed. However, I have my doubts about the wisdom of having different talks simultaneously scheduled in the same exhibition space as I found I could not concentrate at all at these events and gave them a miss. I also found the Pharma Regulatory Focus session rather unsatisfactory. It was generally poorly attended and I thought the content very dry in contrast to last year’s excellent session. I did, however, enjoy Sir Ian Kennedy’s talk without the distraction of powerpoint slides.

The AGM is an integral part of the BAD meeting and lively discussions were had particularly around the issue of subscription rates for different categories of members. However, to my mind, the outstanding event was Professor Bunker’s excellent speech explaining where we’ve come from, where we are now and where we might want to be in the future. He richly deserved the standing ovation he received. As a member of the BAD’s Clinical Services Unit I can only corroborate how sad it is to see how many of our members are struggling and in real conflict with hospital managers and CCGs who are trying to destabilise their services.

More positively, I thought that a great addition to this year’s programme was the contribution made by the newly formed British Society for Skin Care in Immunocompromised individuals. This, combined with the various biologics updates, symposia and case reports, really opened my eyes again to the importance of screening patients very carefully for infections and ensuring that adequate surgical margins are performed for skin cancers in high risk patients. The new format of the BAD meeting means that social events such as the BSF evening walk have been omitted which, I confess, I miss. However, it was good to note the presence of several consultant colleagues who once attended my clinics and wrote audits and case reports as medical students and registrars. Inspiring and teaching the next generation of students and doctors to become dermatologists is a great privilege and I wish to personally thank three great teachers in Professors Cunliffe, Marks and Leigh all of whom have been tremendously supportive to me.

What will I do differently as a result of attending the BAD 2014 conference? Pay my subscription for the British Senior Skin Group; play mindfulness tapes in phototherapy to shorten time to clearance in psoriasis; keep more up to date with the genetics of skin disease and continue to press for proper nursing support to keep running BADBIR within my hospital.

 

BAD meeting in Glasgow was
really positive. As a jobbing dermatologist
I value the opportunity of being able
to benchmark my practice to that of
colleagues from across the UK as well
as Europe and Asia. I have visited
Glasgow and the conference venue on
several occasions. However, this time the
atmosphere in the City was really alive
and buzzing, but I suspect that this had
something to do with the imminent start
of the Commonwealth Games rather than
the arrival of a few hundred enthusiastic
dermatologists! Nevertheless, by arriving
early I was able to spend a wonderful
Monday afternoon soaking up the
atmosphere walking around the botanical
gardens and strolling along the banks of
the River Kelvin and having some brief
retail therapy.
Before the conference starts I usually
find it helpful to plan my programme
of educational events and found using
the BAD app a great first experience. I
would strongly recommend that anyone
coming to a conference brings their
tablet or iPad and use such apps. I found
I could easily set up a full and productive
day and in my spare few minutes I was
able to view the poster abstracts and
then go and read the relevant ones in
more detail during the breaks. However,
using it to take meaningful notes was
challenging and I soon learnt to switch
off auto-suggest and auto-complete
pretty quickly to make any sense of what
Karen Gibbon
Whipps Cross Hospital Karen Gibbon
I’d written! A slight irritation was that I
couldn’t export my notes as a single
document (on which I could also add my
reflections of the meeting for my PDP) –
perhaps this could be addressed for next
year’s conference app? – or maybe the
right ‘techie person’ could have a quiet
word with me about how to do it?
The absence of nurses at the meeting
this year was, for me, a bonus and
I found it much easier to talk to the
exhibitors and sponsors more effectively.
I still enjoyed collecting my samples and
goody bags, but felt everything was much
less rushed. However, I have my doubts
about the wisdom of having different
talks simultaneously scheduled in the
same exhibition space as I found I could
not concentrate at all at these events
and gave them a miss. I also found the
Pharma Regulatory Focus session rather
unsatisfactory. It was generally poorly
attended and I thought the content very
dry in contrast to last year’s excellent
session. I did, however, enjoy Sir Ian
Kennedy’s talk without the distraction of
powerpoint slides.
The AGM is an integral part of the BAD
meeting and lively discussions were
had particularly around the issue of
subscription rates for different categories
of members. However, to my mind, the
outstanding event was Professor Bunker’s
excellent speech explaining where
we’ve come from, where we are now
and where we might want to be in the
future. He richly deserved the standing
ovation he received. As a member of the
BAD’s Clinical Services Unit I can only
corroborate how sad it is to see how
many of our members are struggling and
in real conflict with hospital managers and
CCGs who are trying to destabilise their
services.
More positively, I thought that a great
addition to this year’s programme was
the contribution made by the newly
formed British Society for Skin Care in
Immunocompromised individuals. This,
combined with the various biologics
updates, symposia and case reports,
really opened my eyes again to the
importance of screening patients very
carefully for infections and ensuring that
adequate surgical margins are performed
for skin cancers in high risk patients.
The new format of the BAD meeting
means that social events such as the
BSF evening walk have been omitted
which, I confess, I miss. However, it
was good to note the presence of
several consultant colleagues who once
attended my clinics and wrote audits
and case reports as medical students
and registrars. Inspiring and teaching
the next generation of students and
doctors to become dermatologists is a
great privilege and I wish to personally
thank three great teachers in Professors
Cunliffe, Marks and Leigh all of whom
have been tremendously supportive to
me.
What will I do differently as a result of
attending the BAD 2014 conference?
Pay my subscription for the British
Senior Skin Group; play mindfulness
tapes in phototherapy to shorten time
to clearance in psoriasis; keep more up
to date with the genetics of skin disease
and continue to press for proper nursing
support to keep running BADBIR within
y overwhelming impression of
this year’s very comprehensive
BAD meeting in Glasgow was
really positive. As a jobbing dermatologist
I value the opportunity of being able
to benchmark my practice to that of
colleagues from across the UK as well
as Europe and Asia. I have visited
Glasgow and the conference venue on
several occasions. However, this time the
atmosphere in the City was really alive
and buzzing, but I suspect that this had
something to do with the imminent start
of the Commonwealth Games rather than
the arrival of a few hundred enthusiastic
dermatologists! Nevertheless, by arriving
early I was able to spend a wonderful
Monday afternoon soaking up the
atmosphere walking around the botanical
gardens and strolling along the banks of
the River Kelvin and having some brief
retail therapy.
Whipps Cross HospitalWhipps Cross Hospital
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